FRONT FORK OIL QUANTITY

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BJ
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FRONT FORK OIL QUANTITY

BJ
Greetings folks

According to the Clymer manual - the front fork oil capacity for an XV1100 is 13.1oz
This seems a bit low.
Can anyone confirm the quantity as I want to recondition my front end tomorrow and hopefully get this beast rolling again

Cheers,
BJ
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Re: FRONT FORK OIL QUANTITY

ViragoJoe
This post was updated on .
BJ,
Go back and download the factory manual rather than the clymer's manual.
Clymer's manual may have only specified the Imp oz amount.

Below is all the oil you need for the forks to work properly.

Hope this helps:

372 cc, 13.1 Imp oz, 12.6 (U.S. oz)



Joe
ViragoJoe
1996 Virago 1100 Special
BJ
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Re: FRONT FORK OIL QUANTITY

BJ
cheers Joe - you're a legend mate.

Just to be more of a pain ...... I measured my free spring length once I disassembled my forks - came in at 505mm .... specs site 513mm - do you think the 8mm difference will cause any probs ( maybe a slightly softer front end ) could I not compensate for this by adding a little extra oil. New springs are a big expense - I would rather wait and see if a good second hand front end comes up one day as I also have some rust pitting on the chrome shafts up near the triple tree. have seen a couple of nice ones in the US but the shipping cost is huge. Might have to bite-the-bullet though some time in the future and get one down here ...... just need to let the credit card and the missus settle down a bit :)
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Re: FRONT FORK OIL QUANTITY

ViragoJoe
This post was updated on .
BJ,
No, don't add more oil.  You may blow the seals, if you do.  Stay with the 372 cc's etc., or what other volume measurement you decide to use from the spec sheet above.  Oh, I am well aware, of the misses and the credit card scenario of settling down.

Now you bring me back to a subject that I have become familiar with for a good while now.  The first link below will tell you about my experience with the front forks.  When I first bought my bike the front seals needed to be replaced for they leaked a great deal.  So, I replaced them with new.  Note: not all fork seals are created equal.  Depending on where they are gotten.  The Yamaha OEM's have two wiper lips on the inside edge of the seals.  Some non-OEM's (usually cheaper than OEM's) only have one.  So, you really have to look at the seals closely (if they [seller] posts any pictures [snaps]) to determine if they indeed have two wiper lips inside.  Or take a chance and fly by the seat of your pants and hope they have them.  Guess what, they still weep-ed a little oil.  Now, what I am about to tell you has fixed two issues.

First, I've found that in my Virago 1100 without measuring the springs for length, as you did.  They were just way to soft and mushy, no matter how long they were.  Tried different fork oil weights (viscosities) from others who suggested to do so.  Didn't fix my problem.  Yet, others that I know with 1100's didn't have the same problem.  The dreaded triple tree CLUNK in the front end (or what you think is the Triple tree).  Why?  Only the Lord knows, for I just wanted that problem solved.  With that being said.  Yours truly, went crazy go nuts and started researching everything on the front end.  I read everything I could get my eyes on concerning Front forks and the Triple tree, neck bearings, you name it.  Well, now I know, what the Lord knows.  Well kinda.  My last resort, get a set of (wait for it) PROGRESSIVE SPRINGS.  Springs that create more resistance as they begin to compress.  The more they compress the more resistance they exert to absorb the upward motion (energy) of the fork lower leg travel.  Yaaaa, the dreaded Triple tree Clunk is gone!!

Secondly, with the progressive springs installed the front wheel stopped jeter bugging with the road.  The new springs firmed up the front end.  So, the tire didn't bounce up and down with every ripple in the payment like it did with the old mushy springs.  Eliminating this up and down action (jeter bugging), guess what, the seals stopped weeping oil.  They weren't constantly being rubbed up and down the upper fork shaft more than they needed to be.  Now they don't have to work so hard and can get a chance to recover from the constant change in direction (up and down, up and down).  If that makes sense?!

My suggestion to others:
http://viragohelp.com/phpbb3/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=564&sid=642cf1cb8888df9c91af8ccd99482dfc

Dr. Pistons explanation regarding Virago Suspension Systems:
http://viragohelp.com/virago-suspension-systems/

Hope this helps
Joe
ViragoJoe
1996 Virago 1100 Special